Sebastian Lukacs Gorka

Sebastian Gorka with Trump

Background (Source: Wikipedia)

Gorka Sebestyén Lukács
Born 1970

Of Hungarian ancestry, Gorka was born and grew up in the United Kingdom, lived in Hungary from 1992 to 2008, and as of 2012 is a naturalized American citizen. With a doctorate from Corvinus University of Budapest, Gorka has written over 140 publications on military, strategic, intelligence, and political issues for a wide variety of publications, but these works have not cited widely.

According to the Washington Post, Gorka’s academic credentials are “thin”. He is generally considered a conservative, and believes that religious ideology plays an important role in much of anti-American terrorism. As a national security advisor Gorka specializes in irregular warfare, counterinsurgency and counterterrorism

Academic Career

Publications: Defeating Jihad: The Winnable War (ISBN 978-1-62157-457-6), Regnery Publishing, 2016.

Plagiarism: Parts of his Ph.D. dissertation came under scrutiny in 2016 because either his wife had later used them without attribution, or else Gorka himself had borrowed passages from her, prior to her publishing them.

Government Career

From 2017, Gorka was a deputy assistant in the presidency of Donald Trump. Gorka is a member of a White House team known as the Strategic Initiatives Group, which was set up by Gorka’s former boss, Steve Bannon, together with the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner.

Rejecting the approach of the previous two administrations, Gorka sees Islamic terrorism as essentially ideologically motivated and rooted in a totalitarian religious mindset. He backs President Trump’s usage of the phrase “Radical Islamic Terrorism.”

Fringe views

Gorka has been characterized as a fringe figure in academic and policy-making circles. According to the Washington Post, “Gorka’s academic credentials, particularly on the subject of ­Islam, are thin.” Several experts have questioned both Gorka’s knowledge of foreign policy issues and his professional behavior. His published works have not been widely cited among scholars of terrorism and national-security experts. According to the New York Times, some have described Gorka as being part of “the Islamophobia industry, a network of researchers who have warned for many years of the dangers of Islam”.

Rejecting the approach of the previous two administrations, Gorka sees Islamic terrorism as essentially ideologically motivated and rooted in a totalitarian religious mindset. He backs President Trump’s usage of the phrase “Radical Islamic Terrorism.”

Accusations of Being a Nazi sympathizer, Anti Semitism

Nazi SympathizerSebastian Gorka is a member of the Order of Vitéz (Hungarian: Vitézi Rend), a hereditary order of merit founded by Miklós Horthy in 1920 that is listed in the U. S. State Department Foreign Affairs Manual and Handbook under “Organizations Under the Direction of the Nazi Government of Germany.” Membership in this group is grounds for U.S. visa ineligibility. Although required to list and renounce his membership in the Order of Vitéz on his N-400 Application for Naturalization in 2012 when he sought U.S. citizenship, Gorka appeared on FOX News on the evening of the 2017 U.S. presidential inauguration dressed in the uniform and wearing the badge, tunic, and ring of the Order of Vitéz.[39][40] This has given rise to claims that Gorka carries sympathy for the Nazis.

Sebastian Gorka stated that he wears this medal in remembrance of his father, Paul Gorka, who was awarded the decoration in 1979 for his efforts to create a pro-democracy, anti-Communist organization at the university he attended in Hungary. Sebastian Gorka recounted that his father lived through the German occupation of Budapest and the siege of Budapest as a child (Hungary in World War II), and was tortured under the Communist regime that emerged in Hungary after war. Hungarian expert of the Order of Vitéz, Robert Kerepeszki has stressed that there were ruptures in the organization of the Order of Vitéz on the question of Nazism during the war, many of them died fighting against Hungarian Nazis, and Gorka’s medal had nothing to do with the interwar period.

In February 2017, the Forward reported that while Gorka was active in Hungarian politics, he had “close ties then to Hungarian far-right circles”. The Forward also reported that he “has in the past chosen to work with openly racist and anti-Semitic groups and public figures.” The Forward found that “Gorka’s involvement with the far right includes co-founding a political party with former prominent members of Jobbik, a political party with a well-known history of anti-Semitism; repeatedly publishing articles in a newspaper known for its anti-Semitic and racist content; and attending events with some of Hungary’s most notorious extreme-right figures.”

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